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George

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  1. George

    Lower Camster broch

    The remains of Lower Camster broch are atop a roughly circular natural knoll overlooking a rocky escarpment. It appears that the broch was sited within a defensive enclosure and ditches, but it has been robbed and quarried so that no structural details remain above ground. The two Camster brochs are on private farmland with working dogs and sheep, so be sure to ask for permission before going tramping around the brochs. Reproduced by permission of Ordnance Survey on behalf of HMSO. © Crown Copyright. All rights reserved. Disclaimer: Some brochs were built with military defensive purpose, and as such can be situated in extremely dangerous areas, such as on the edge of cliffs and ravines. Additionally, these are Iron Age structures, most of them in ruins, and they are extremely hazardous, with crumbling stone walls and hidden chambers. Existing walls, lintels, and passages could collapse at any time. The information here is provided free but it is your responsibility to ensure its accuracy, ensure your own safety, and acquire permissions for access where necessary. Accessing brochs is done entirely at your own risk.
  2. George

    Loth broch

    The only way we know there was a broch here is because of an old 1793 report, which states that stone from the broch was used to build a farmhouse and a manse for the nearby church. The present day site is too indefinite to say with certainty that it was a broch without further archaeological diggings. The stone in the manse and farmhouse, however, is almost certainly contemporary with the stone still at the site. The broch site isn't marked on maps or otherwise, and if you didn't know it was there, you would miss it. So be sure to know exactly where you're going before setting off. The easiest access is by walking the shore from the caravan park on the links at Crackaig. The going can be a bit rough in places. Reproduced by permission of Ordnance Survey on behalf of HMSO. © Crown Copyright. All rights reserved. Disclaimer: Some brochs were built with military defensive purpose, and as such can be situated in extremely dangerous areas, such as on the edge of cliffs and ravines. Additionally, these are Iron Age structures, most of them in ruins, and they are extremely hazardous, with crumbling stone walls and hidden chambers. Existing walls, lintels, and passages could collapse at any time. The information here is provided free but it is your responsibility to ensure its accuracy, ensure your own safety, and acquire permissions for access where necessary. Accessing brochs is done entirely at your own risk.
  3. George

    Loch Brora broch (Killin)

    Loch Brora broch has a military feel to it, and was probably a garrison to protect the brochs along the south shores of Loch Brora. One very interesting strategic fact about Killin, is that it can be clearly seen from the three brochs on the south banks of Loch Brora, but cannot be seen from north bank towards the coast. Roman legions landing at Brora would have probably marched with their eyes on the brochs on the south banks of the loch, unaware of the military garrison behind them. The broch is in ruins, and there is very little to see other than a mass of stones and a few architectural details. Access is by way of a good walking track from Oldtown, just before Gordonbush. There is a bridge over the burn at the start of the track, and you can find somewhere to park nearby. The track makes its way through a forestry plantation, but there is a good quality gate at each end designed for walkers, both of which are easy to negotiate. The broch isn't visible from the track, so take your map with you so you know when to leave the track and strike out for the broch. Reproduced by permission of Ordnance Survey on behalf of HMSO. © Crown Copyright. All rights reserved. Disclaimer: Some brochs were built with military defensive purpose, and as such can be situated in extremely dangerous areas, such as on the edge of cliffs and ravines. Additionally, these are Iron Age structures, most of them in ruins, and they are extremely hazardous, with crumbling stone walls and hidden chambers. Existing walls, lintels, and passages could collapse at any time. The information here is provided free but it is your responsibility to ensure its accuracy, ensure your own safety, and acquire permissions for access where necessary. Accessing brochs is done entirely at your own risk.
  4. George

    Learable broch

    The current status of this broch is that it is too much robbed and overgrown to state that it is a broch with any certainty. However, in 1873 and again in 1883, two separate authorities (J Anderson and H Morrison) both declared that Learable was indeed a broch. As brochs were in much better condition back then, I see no reason to doubt their records. From Learable you can see the Kilearnan broch, so line of sight can be confirmed from the Kilphedir broch to the Suisgill broch. However, it is such a distance, that I'm of the opinion there is a missing broch site around the Kildonan Burn area linking Learable with Kilearnan. From the single track road through the Strath of Kildonan, use the foot bridge over the River Helmsdale, skirt any electric fences, and make your way up the hillside. The ground can be boggy, and there is a railway to negotiate so good footwear and clothing would be recommended. The broch isn't marked on any maps. Reproduced by permission of Ordnance Survey on behalf of HMSO. © Crown Copyright. All rights reserved. Disclaimer: Some brochs were built with military defensive purpose, and as such can be situated in extremely dangerous areas, such as on the edge of cliffs and ravines. Additionally, these are Iron Age structures, most of them in ruins, and they are extremely hazardous, with crumbling stone walls and hidden chambers. Existing walls, lintels, and passages could collapse at any time. The information here is provided free but it is your responsibility to ensure its accuracy, ensure your own safety, and acquire permissions for access where necessary. Accessing brochs is done entirely at your own risk.
  5. George

    Leadoch broch

    There is nothing left to see here but a pile of plundered rubble. There is however, one small section where the original stonework still exists and is visible. I suspect there is much underground still intact awaiting excavation. The views over Loch Brora are astonishing. Access is the same as for the Carrol broch, and you could probably manage both in a day trip. It is best to park at the ford across the River Brora (marked on the map), at the start of the forestry track along the north bank of Loch Brora, where there is plenty of car parking space, and walk from there. The broch can be difficult to find owing to the little of it that's left being overgrown, so be sure to take your map with you. Reproduced by permission of Ordnance Survey on behalf of HMSO. © Crown Copyright. All rights reserved. Disclaimer: Some brochs were built with military defensive purpose, and as such can be situated in extremely dangerous areas, such as on the edge of cliffs and ravines. Additionally, these are Iron Age structures, most of them in ruins, and they are extremely hazardous, with crumbling stone walls and hidden chambers. Existing walls, lintels, and passages could collapse at any time. The information here is provided free but it is your responsibility to ensure its accuracy, ensure your own safety, and acquire permissions for access where necessary. Accessing brochs is done entirely at your own risk.
  6. George

    Leachonich broch

    There isn't much left here but a pile of rubble. It's quite sad to realise that just 200 years ago, most of these brochs were still standing and were pulled down to build roads, stone dykes, and cottages. I can understand that a ready supply of free stone would be tempting to use, but I just wish more had been done to preserve these Scottish war memorials. I'm hopeful that perhaps we may even yet pull together as a nation and start preserving what's left of them. These things are the backbone of Scotland. It would be a real shame to lose what's left of them to grass, weeds and gorse. You can drive and park not far from the broch. Please be aware that you will be accessing private land, and that you will have to open and close gates behind you. When approaching the broch, you will be very close to a private dwelling house, so again, show consideration and respect for those who live there. Reproduced by permission of Ordnance Survey on behalf of HMSO. © Crown Copyright. All rights reserved. Disclaimer: Some brochs were built with military defensive purpose, and as such can be situated in extremely dangerous areas, such as on the edge of cliffs and ravines. Additionally, these are Iron Age structures, most of them in ruins, and they are extremely hazardous, with crumbling stone walls and hidden chambers. Existing walls, lintels, and passages could collapse at any time. The information here is provided free but it is your responsibility to ensure its accuracy, ensure your own safety, and acquire permissions for access where necessary. Accessing brochs is done entirely at your own risk.
  7. George

    Latheronwheel Bridge broch

    An overgrown mound with very little to see above ground other than a short section of exposed wall. Forty human skulls are said to have been excavated from the broch sometime before 1910, but there is no record of their whereabouts. I would suggest that folks back then had more respect for the dead than the Burke and Hare grave robbers of today who call themselves archaeologists and that they are probably buried nearby under that pile of stones that resembles a cairn. Find parking nearby in Latheronwheel, and follow the track along the banks of the Burn of Latheronwheel from the A9 which takes you directly to the broch. Reproduced by permission of Ordnance Survey on behalf of HMSO. © Crown Copyright. All rights reserved. Disclaimer: Some brochs were built with military defensive purpose, and as such can be situated in extremely dangerous areas, such as on the edge of cliffs and ravines. Additionally, these are Iron Age structures, most of them in ruins, and they are extremely hazardous, with crumbling stone walls and hidden chambers. Existing walls, lintels, and passages could collapse at any time. The information here is provided free but it is your responsibility to ensure its accuracy, ensure your own safety, and acquire permissions for access where necessary. Accessing brochs is done entirely at your own risk.
  8. George

    Langwell Tulloch broch

    This broch is a jumbled mess, and quite difficult to find without a map as the site doesn't resemble a broch in the slightest. It has been robbed to death and it looks as if a road has been bulldozed through part of the actual broch itself. What's left is heavily overgrown. There may be some of the original broch lying intact below ground, but it would take the work of a professional archeological team to make any sense of the ruins. Access is through the Langwell estate, so you should contact the Factor to arrange access. If you need to cross the river, some of the footbridges marked on the map no longer exist, having been washed away in recent spates. You can park at the top of Berriedale Brae and walk down the marked track right to the broch. Reproduced by permission of Ordnance Survey on behalf of HMSO. © Crown Copyright. All rights reserved. Disclaimer: Some brochs were built with military defensive purpose, and as such can be situated in extremely dangerous areas, such as on the edge of cliffs and ravines. Additionally, these are Iron Age structures, most of them in ruins, and they are extremely hazardous, with crumbling stone walls and hidden chambers. Existing walls, lintels, and passages could collapse at any time. The information here is provided free but it is your responsibility to ensure its accuracy, ensure your own safety, and acquire permissions for access where necessary. Accessing brochs is done entirely at your own risk.
  9. George

    Langdale broch

    As this was a part of Scotland I'd never seen before, this was an exciting day out. Brochs are a great way to see Scotland. Just up the road from Syre is the Langdale broch on the banks of the Langdale burn. It's easy to see from the road and commands a good view all round. There isn't much left of the broch you can see above ground, but the interior wall can be traced practically all the way around. Access is simple and easy going. There is a wooden stile by the road, and from there walking is easy all the way to the broch. From the stile, follow the stone wall around the farm, then cut across to the left hand side of the gate and follow the track to the broch. Reproduced by permission of Ordnance Survey on behalf of HMSO. © Crown Copyright. All rights reserved. Disclaimer: Some brochs were built with military defensive purpose, and as such can be situated in extremely dangerous areas, such as on the edge of cliffs and ravines. Additionally, these are Iron Age structures, most of them in ruins, and they are extremely hazardous, with crumbling stone walls and hidden chambers. Existing walls, lintels, and passages could collapse at any time. The information here is provided free but it is your responsibility to ensure its accuracy, ensure your own safety, and acquire permissions for access where necessary. Accessing brochs is done entirely at your own risk.
  10. George

    Knockinnon broch

    A grassy mound beside the A9 is all that's visible above ground, but there is a portion of a surrounding bank or defensive wall on the north side. There are plenty of broch sites in the area, and this one is in view of quite a few, including some of the Dunbeath brochs. Line of sight was obviously important for communication. Turn in off the A9 north of Dunbeath onto a single track road and find parking near the broch that doesn't obstruct traffic. The broch is on private farmland with livestock, so let the farmer know what you're up to in case he's working with his animals and be sure to close the gate. Reproduced by permission of Ordnance Survey on behalf of HMSO. © Crown Copyright. All rights reserved. Disclaimer: Some brochs were built with military defensive purpose, and as such can be situated in extremely dangerous areas, such as on the edge of cliffs and ravines. Additionally, these are Iron Age structures, most of them in ruins, and they are extremely hazardous, with crumbling stone walls and hidden chambers. Existing walls, lintels, and passages could collapse at any time. The information here is provided free but it is your responsibility to ensure its accuracy, ensure your own safety, and acquire permissions for access where necessary. Accessing brochs is done entirely at your own risk.
  11. George

    Kintradwell broch (Cinn Trolla)

    Sited on the coast just a few miles north of Brora, Kintradwell, or Cinn Trolla, remains in reasonably good condition for a broch. It has chambers, surviving walls, the ruins of outbuildings surrounding the main site, an entrance that still stands, and interior walls in fairly good condition. Access is via a gate to a farmer's fields so please leave the gate unobstructed. There is parking on the verge of the A9 about 200 yards south, beside the entrance to Kintradwell Lodge and you can walk from there. This is a fast road, narrow and dangerous. Reproduced by permission of Ordnance Survey on behalf of HMSO. © Crown Copyright. All rights reserved. Disclaimer: Some brochs were built with military defensive purpose, and as such can be situated in extremely dangerous areas, such as on the edge of cliffs and ravines. Additionally, these are Iron Age structures, most of them in ruins, and they are extremely hazardous, with crumbling stone walls and hidden chambers. Existing walls, lintels, and passages could collapse at any time. The information here is provided free but it is your responsibility to ensure its accuracy, ensure your own safety, and acquire permissions for access where necessary. Accessing brochs is done entirely at your own risk.
  12. George

    Kilphedir broch

    The broch is built in a commanding position defending the Strath of Kildonan, and is strengthened by massive outworks. There is a deep ditch, an outer rampart wall over 10ft wide, and then an outer ditch. The entrance still exists, and it appears there was no entrance chamber. There is plenty of parking by the bridge over the Kilphedir burn, and from there you can walk up a track (remembering to shut the gate), and strike across to the broch when you reach the top of the hill. Remember, there is deer stalking on this estate, so keep to the track. Reproduced by permission of Ordnance Survey on behalf of HMSO. © Crown Copyright. All rights reserved. Disclaimer: Some brochs were built with military defensive purpose, and as such can be situated in extremely dangerous areas, such as on the edge of cliffs and ravines. Additionally, these are Iron Age structures, most of them in ruins, and they are extremely hazardous, with crumbling stone walls and hidden chambers. Existing walls, lintels, and passages could collapse at any time. The information here is provided free but it is your responsibility to ensure its accuracy, ensure your own safety, and acquire permissions for access where necessary. Accessing brochs is done entirely at your own risk.
  13. George

    Kilearnan Hill broch

    There is just a pile of small rubble here. In a few years, this one will be gone, buried under heather and ferns. That it has lasted 2000 years is simply remarkable. It is built on a knoll beside the burn but it is now completely demolished. Only a few heaps of small stones remain. Parking is the same as for the Kilearnan broch, which you have to walk past to get to this one. Take the Glen Loth single track road from the A9 or from Kildonan Station, bearing in mind that the road is not snow cleared in winter. This road is not suitable for caravans. Reproduced by permission of Ordnance Survey on behalf of HMSO. © Crown Copyright. All rights reserved. Disclaimer: Some brochs were built with military defensive purpose, and as such can be situated in extremely dangerous areas, such as on the edge of cliffs and ravines. Additionally, these are Iron Age structures, most of them in ruins, and they are extremely hazardous, with crumbling stone walls and hidden chambers. Existing walls, lintels, and passages could collapse at any time. The information here is provided free but it is your responsibility to ensure its accuracy, ensure your own safety, and acquire permissions for access where necessary. Accessing brochs is done entirely at your own risk.
  14. George

    Kilearnan broch

    There is nothing left now other than a pile of rubble. No portion of the inner wall was visible when visited, but the lowest course of the outer face can be seen in places. Access is simple enough, with plenty of space to park. You can take the Glen Loth single track road from the A9 or from Kildonan Station in the Strath of Kildonan, and the broch is only 100 yards or so from the parking area. This road through Glen Loth isn't snow cleared, and it is not suitable for caravans. Reproduced by permission of Ordnance Survey on behalf of HMSO. © Crown Copyright. All rights reserved. Disclaimer: Some brochs were built with military defensive purpose, and as such can be situated in extremely dangerous areas, such as on the edge of cliffs and ravines. Additionally, these are Iron Age structures, most of them in ruins, and they are extremely hazardous, with crumbling stone walls and hidden chambers. Existing walls, lintels, and passages could collapse at any time. The information here is provided free but it is your responsibility to ensure its accuracy, ensure your own safety, and acquire permissions for access where necessary. Accessing brochs is done entirely at your own risk.
  15. George

    Kilbraur broch

    This is another of the Loch Brora brochs, this one situated at the top of the loch on the southern bank of the River Brora. It has extensive defensive outer walls surrounding the main site. Apart from the knoll on which the broch was built, there is little left to see other than a post clearances sheep circle on top of the site. Access is from the north bank of the River Brora, then across an old footbridge, and crossing farmland to access the broch site. The old footbridge is in a dilapidated state and is not safe. Permission for access should also be sought as you have to cross private farmland to gain access to the broch. There is a ford and another footbridge across the River Brora upstream at Balnacoil, and it would be safer to cross there and walk down the track. Reproduced by permission of Ordnance Survey on behalf of HMSO. © Crown Copyright. All rights reserved. Disclaimer: Some brochs were built with military defensive purpose, and as such can be situated in extremely dangerous areas, such as on the edge of cliffs and ravines. Additionally, these are Iron Age structures, most of them in ruins, and they are extremely hazardous, with crumbling stone walls and hidden chambers. Existing walls, lintels, and passages could collapse at any time. The information here is provided free but it is your responsibility to ensure its accuracy, ensure your own safety, and acquire permissions for access where necessary. Accessing brochs is done entirely at your own risk.
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