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  2. George

    Brochs chat

    That's the library up to date -107 brochs to date.
  3. George

    Watenan South Broch

    This one was surprisingly difficult to find. On the map it looked as if it was impossible to miss, so I didn't take care with my planning and didn't have a map with me. I had my phone and there was an internet connection, so I checked maps online and eventually found it. You can't really see it until you're standing in it, and even then you'd only know it was a broch if you were looking for it. You can park by the south end of the loch and walk from there. Reproduced by permission of Ordnance Survey on behalf of HMSO. © Crown Copyright. All rights reserved. Disclaimer: Some brochs were built with military defensive purpose, and as such can be situated in extremely dangerous areas, such as on the edge of cliffs and ravines. Additionally, these are Iron Age structures, most of them in ruins, and they are extremely hazardous, with crumbling stone walls and hidden chambers. Existing walls, lintels, and passages could collapse at any time. The information here is provided free but it is your responsibility to ensure its accuracy, ensure your own safety, and acquire permissions for access where necessary. Accessing brochs is done entirely at your own risk.
  4. George

    Watenan North Broch

    Another grassy mound, but there is stonework showing through in places. You can park at the south end of Loch Watenan, and walk from there. Depending on your route, you may have to ask the farmer for access through his farm. If you walk along the shores of the loch, that may not be a problem. There is a stile over the fence, so take the time to find it to ensure no damage to property. Reproduced by permission of Ordnance Survey on behalf of HMSO. © Crown Copyright. All rights reserved. Disclaimer: Some brochs were built with military defensive purpose, and as such can be situated in extremely dangerous areas, such as on the edge of cliffs and ravines. Additionally, these are Iron Age structures, most of them in ruins, and they are extremely hazardous, with crumbling stone walls and hidden chambers. Existing walls, lintels, and passages could collapse at any time. The information here is provided free but it is your responsibility to ensure its accuracy, ensure your own safety, and acquire permissions for access where necessary. Accessing brochs is done entirely at your own risk.
  5. George

    Warehouse Hill broch

    Plenty of archaeology here, and even quite a bit to see poking through the grassy mound. There is even a section of original stonework showing. An interesting aspect of the broch is the Iron Age stone bridge over the burn right beside it, which is still there. No easy access to this one unfortunately, this is a major trek no matter which route you take. It's rough going too, through heather, moor and bog. This is a serious day out and isn't one for the unprepared. Be sure to have a map and compass with you as well, because if the fog comes down you will be lost without them. Only walkers who understand the moor and know what they're doing should attempt this. I parked at Loch of Yarrows and walked from there, but in hindsight I would choose another route were I to return, as the track to the chambered cairns marked on the map is non existent in many places. Reproduced by permission of Ordnance Survey on behalf of HMSO. © Crown Copyright. All rights reserved. Disclaimer: Some brochs were built with military defensive purpose, and as such can be situated in extremely dangerous areas, such as on the edge of cliffs and ravines. Additionally, these are Iron Age structures, most of them in ruins, and they are extremely hazardous, with crumbling stone walls and hidden chambers. Existing walls, lintels, and passages could collapse at any time. The information here is provided free but it is your responsibility to ensure its accuracy, ensure your own safety, and acquire permissions for access where necessary. Accessing brochs is done entirely at your own risk.
  6. George

    Tulach Lochain Bhraseil broch

    A grassy mound is all there is to see here, in a beautiful spot on the banks of the River Thurso at Westerdale. Access is via a stile beside the bridge. Reproduced by permission of Ordnance Survey on behalf of HMSO. © Crown Copyright. All rights reserved. Disclaimer: Some brochs were built with military defensive purpose, and as such can be situated in extremely dangerous areas, such as on the edge of cliffs and ravines. Additionally, these are Iron Age structures, most of them in ruins, and they are extremely hazardous, with crumbling stone walls and hidden chambers. Existing walls, lintels, and passages could collapse at any time. The information here is provided free but it is your responsibility to ensure its accuracy, ensure your own safety, and acquire permissions for access where necessary. Accessing brochs is done entirely at your own risk.
  7. George

    Tulach Buaile a Chroic Broch

    There must have been quite a community of Picts living around Westerdale for so many to be clustered so closely together. I'm sure they had many happy days, despite the bastard Romans and their lust for one world governance. There are three brochs clustered together here on the banks of the River Thurso. Access is via a stile beside the bridge. Reproduced by permission of Ordnance Survey on behalf of HMSO. © Crown Copyright. All rights reserved. Disclaimer: Some brochs were built with military defensive purpose, and as such can be situated in extremely dangerous areas, such as on the edge of cliffs and ravines. Additionally, these are Iron Age structures, most of them in ruins, and they are extremely hazardous, with crumbling stone walls and hidden chambers. Existing walls, lintels, and passages could collapse at any time. The information here is provided free but it is your responsibility to ensure its accuracy, ensure your own safety, and acquire permissions for access where necessary. Accessing brochs is done entirely at your own risk.
  8. George

    Tulach Mor broch

    Tulach Mor isn't far along the banks of the River Thurso from Tulach Beag, and these two brochs are not that far from a bunch of brochs around Westerdale and Mybster. There must have been quite a community of Picts for so many brochs to be within easy reach of each other. Access is by walking through the Bad a'Cheo windfarm. Keep to the tracks and it isn't far from them to the brochs. The ground is boggy off the tracks, so try to pick a dry route to the banks of the River Thurso. Take a good map with you that has the brochs marked to help you find them, or use GPS if you have it. Reproduced by permission of Ordnance Survey on behalf of HMSO. © Crown Copyright. All rights reserved. Disclaimer: Some brochs were built with military defensive purpose, and as such can be situated in extremely dangerous areas, such as on the edge of cliffs and ravines. Additionally, these are Iron Age structures, most of them in ruins, and they are extremely hazardous, with crumbling stone walls and hidden chambers. Existing walls, lintels, and passages could collapse at any time. The information here is provided free but it is your responsibility to ensure its accuracy, ensure your own safety, and acquire permissions for access where necessary. Accessing brochs is done entirely at your own risk.
  9. George

    Tulach Beag Broch

    Tulach Beag isn't far along the banks of the River Thurso from Tulach Mor, and these two brochs are not that far from a bunch of brochs around Westerdale and Mybster. There must have been quite a community of Picts for so many brochs to be within easy reach of each other. Access is by walking through the Bad a'Cheo windfarm. Keep to the tracks and it isn't far from them to the brochs. The ground is boggy off the tracks, so try to pick a dry route to the banks of the River Thurso. Take a good map with you that has the brochs marked to help you find them, or use GPS if you have it. There isn't much left of this one other than a low grassy hillock, so it's easy to miss. Reproduced by permission of Ordnance Survey on behalf of HMSO. © Crown Copyright. All rights reserved. Disclaimer: Some brochs were built with military defensive purpose, and as such can be situated in extremely dangerous areas, such as on the edge of cliffs and ravines. Additionally, these are Iron Age structures, most of them in ruins, and they are extremely hazardous, with crumbling stone walls and hidden chambers. Existing walls, lintels, and passages could collapse at any time. The information here is provided free but it is your responsibility to ensure its accuracy, ensure your own safety, and acquire permissions for access where necessary. Accessing brochs is done entirely at your own risk.
  10. George

    Tulach An Fhuarain Broch

    There are 3 brochs clustered beside each other, all nestled on the banks of the River Thurso, with a few more brochs within easy walking distance. There must have been quite a community of Picts living there. The broch is quarried and mutilated to death, and survives only as a grassy mound. Access is by stile over a fence bordering the B870 beside the bridge over the River Thurso. This is a beautiful spot and all 3 brochs can be easily visited in one outing. Reproduced by permission of Ordnance Survey on behalf of HMSO. © Crown Copyright. All rights reserved. Disclaimer: Some brochs were built with military defensive purpose, and as such can be situated in extremely dangerous areas, such as on the edge of cliffs and ravines. Additionally, these are Iron Age structures, most of them in ruins, and they are extremely hazardous, with crumbling stone walls and hidden chambers. Existing walls, lintels, and passages could collapse at any time. The information here is provided free but it is your responsibility to ensure its accuracy, ensure your own safety, and acquire permissions for access where necessary. Accessing brochs is done entirely at your own risk.
  11. George

    Tota An Dranndain Broch

    The broch has been completely quarried and there is very little left above ground. I suspect some of the broch may still have considerable original stonework below ground, but without archeological digs, it is almost impossible to determine much about it other than its original diameter. It's quite difficult to see from the road, and there is no easy path to it that I could find. I did see some unusually large stones lying around the site. Rough walking, a stream to cross, and more rough walking was the order of the day. Reproduced by permission of Ordnance Survey on behalf of HMSO. © Crown Copyright. All rights reserved. Disclaimer: Some brochs were built with military defensive purpose, and as such can be situated in extremely dangerous areas, such as on the edge of cliffs and ravines. Additionally, these are Iron Age structures, most of them in ruins, and they are extremely hazardous, with crumbling stone walls and hidden chambers. Existing walls, lintels, and passages could collapse at any time. The information here is provided free but it is your responsibility to ensure its accuracy, ensure your own safety, and acquire permissions for access where necessary. Accessing brochs is done entirely at your own risk.
  12. George

    The Pap broch

    Another rather uninteresting grassy mound which is easy to miss if you didn't know there was a broch there. What's left of the broch is completely underground. Although it's right beside a road, access isn't easy. It's on the grounds of a retirement home, and there are barbed wire fences in the way. I knocked on the door of the retirement home, but it might be easier to approach from the farmland to the west or north. Reproduced by permission of Ordnance Survey on behalf of HMSO. © Crown Copyright. All rights reserved. Disclaimer: Some brochs were built with military defensive purpose, and as such can be situated in extremely dangerous areas, such as on the edge of cliffs and ravines. Additionally, these are Iron Age structures, most of them in ruins, and they are extremely hazardous, with crumbling stone walls and hidden chambers. Existing walls, lintels, and passages could collapse at any time. The information here is provided free but it is your responsibility to ensure its accuracy, ensure your own safety, and acquire permissions for access where necessary. Accessing brochs is done entirely at your own risk.
  13. George

    Nybster broch

    Plenty to see at Nybster! There is even a prehistoric mound on the site. Both interior and exterior original stonework still stands to a good height, and there are outbuildings all around the main broch. Access is easy and suitable for anyone. There is parking and a good path to the broch. However, the path skirts cliffs, and the broch itself is built on a rocky promontory, with sheer cliffs on 3 sides. If visiting the broch, stay clear of the cliff edges and keep children away from them. Reproduced by permission of Ordnance Survey on behalf of HMSO. © Crown Copyright. All rights reserved. Disclaimer: Some brochs were built with military defensive purpose, and as such can be situated in extremely dangerous areas, such as on the edge of cliffs and ravines. Additionally, these are Iron Age structures, most of them in ruins, and they are extremely hazardous, with crumbling stone walls and hidden chambers. Existing walls, lintels, and passages could collapse at any time. The information here is provided free but it is your responsibility to ensure its accuracy, ensure your own safety, and acquire permissions for access where necessary. Accessing brochs is done entirely at your own risk.
  14. George

    Mybster broch

    There are quite a few brochs around Mybster and Westerdale, so there must have been quite a community of Picts raising families in the area for centuries. As they kept no written records, we can only look at what they've left behind, scratch our heads and guess at their culture. That their brochs have survived since the iron age surely stands as a testament to their architectural genius. How many of our current buildings will still be around in 100 years, let alone 2000 years? The broch is right beside the road, and there is a gate into the field. You can see what needs to be seen from the roadside, without the need to enter the field. Here and there small patches of original stonework still poke through the grassy mound. Reproduced by permission of Ordnance Survey on behalf of HMSO. © Crown Copyright. All rights reserved. Disclaimer: Some brochs were built with military defensive purpose, and as such can be situated in extremely dangerous areas, such as on the edge of cliffs and ravines. Additionally, these are Iron Age structures, most of them in ruins, and they are extremely hazardous, with crumbling stone walls and hidden chambers. Existing walls, lintels, and passages could collapse at any time. The information here is provided free but it is your responsibility to ensure its accuracy, ensure your own safety, and acquire permissions for access where necessary. Accessing brochs is done entirely at your own risk.
  15. George

    Latheronwheel Mains Broch

    Another grassy mound, with only the odd stone poking through the grass here and there. The broch is in clear sight of the two brochs at Smerral and the Latheronewheel Bridge broch, and most likely the Knockinnon and Achnagoul brochs as well. Communications seems to be the defining factor in broch placement around the Highlands. Well, they didn't have phones and internet back then, did they? To get word around the Highlands quickly of Roman landings would have been of paramount importance. My guess is that all brochs throughout the Highlands were interconnected by line of sight which would have been a prerequisite to site selection. Reproduced by permission of Ordnance Survey on behalf of HMSO. © Crown Copyright. All rights reserved. Disclaimer: Some brochs were built with military defensive purpose, and as such can be situated in extremely dangerous areas, such as on the edge of cliffs and ravines. Additionally, these are Iron Age structures, most of them in ruins, and they are extremely hazardous, with crumbling stone walls and hidden chambers. Existing walls, lintels, and passages could collapse at any time. The information here is provided free but it is your responsibility to ensure its accuracy, ensure your own safety, and acquire permissions for access where necessary. Accessing brochs is done entirely at your own risk.
  16. George

    Whitegate broch

    Along with Keiss and Kirk Tofts, these three brochs form a formidable triangular defence against any seaborne landings by Romans. I'm pretty sure archers could have easily reached the shoreline from the tops of this and the Keiss broch. It took sheer military genius to defeat the Romans, and it's very evident here even 2000 years later. Park somewhere out of the way near Keiss harbour, and the Keiss and Whitegate brochs are easily accessible nearby. There are fences around the sites, so use the gates rather than clamber over the fences and risk damaging them. Reproduced by permission of Ordnance Survey on behalf of HMSO. © Crown Copyright. All rights reserved. Disclaimer: Some brochs were built with military defensive purpose, and as such can be situated in extremely dangerous areas, such as on the edge of cliffs and ravines. Additionally, these are Iron Age structures, most of them in ruins, and they are extremely hazardous, with crumbling stone walls and hidden chambers. Existing walls, lintels, and passages could collapse at any time. The information here is provided free but it is your responsibility to ensure its accuracy, ensure your own safety, and acquire permissions for access where necessary. Accessing brochs is done entirely at your own risk.
  17. George

    Kirk Tofts Broch

    Along with Keiss and Whitegate, these three brochs form a formidable triangular defence against any seaborne landings by Romans. Kirk Tofts is an extensive site with many outbuildings surrounding the broch. I guess it could have been a garrision to support the Whitegate and Keiss brochs. Once the Roman threat was over, the broch appears to have grown through another phase, and I believe at some point there was even a small church built on the site using stone from the broch. There is much to see here between the grassy mounds, but making sense of it all would need the skills of an expert broch archeologist. Park somewhere in Keiss and it's just a short walk along the road to the entrance to the broch. Be very careful on the site, as there are many chambers and passages hidden between the grassy mounds. Reproduced by permission of Ordnance Survey on behalf of HMSO. © Crown Copyright. All rights reserved. Disclaimer: Some brochs were built with military defensive purpose, and as such can be situated in extremely dangerous areas, such as on the edge of cliffs and ravines. Additionally, these are Iron Age structures, most of them in ruins, and they are extremely hazardous, with crumbling stone walls and hidden chambers. Existing walls, lintels, and passages could collapse at any time. The information here is provided free but it is your responsibility to ensure its accuracy, ensure your own safety, and acquire permissions for access where necessary. Accessing brochs is done entirely at your own risk.
  18. George

    Keiss broch

    Along with Whitegate and Kirk Tofts, these three brochs must have posed a formidable triangular defence against any seaborne landings by Romans. Being so close to the sea, it's not unthinkable to assume the Picts may have had the ability to attack and sink Roman galleons somehow before they actually landed any troops. Of course, archers would have been on hand as well, and they could have easily covered the shoreline from the tops of the Keiss and Whitegate brochs. It took sheer military genius to defeat the Romans, and it's very evident here even 2000 years later. Park somewhere out of the way near Keiss harbour, and the Keiss and Whitegate brochs are easily accessible nearby. There are fences around the sites, so use the gates rather than clamber over the fences and risk damaging them. Reproduced by permission of Ordnance Survey on behalf of HMSO. © Crown Copyright. All rights reserved. Disclaimer: Some brochs were built with military defensive purpose, and as such can be situated in extremely dangerous areas, such as on the edge of cliffs and ravines. Additionally, these are Iron Age structures, most of them in ruins, and they are extremely hazardous, with crumbling stone walls and hidden chambers. Existing walls, lintels, and passages could collapse at any time. The information here is provided free but it is your responsibility to ensure its accuracy, ensure your own safety, and acquire permissions for access where necessary. Accessing brochs is done entirely at your own risk.
  19. It must have been quite something living around Loch Naver during the Iron Age. It appears as if there are a couple of small crannogs near where the loch flows out into the River Naver. While sitting on the broch, stuffing my face with lunch, I had an idea about those crannogs. It is possible that the Picts channelled water to trap salmon. Having a larder full of fresh salmon jumping around your front door would have been desirable, and they could easily have let them run through at the back end to spawn. Access is fairly simple, park somewhere off the road, walk down the track, and then walk along the shores of Loch Naver to the broch. Reproduced by permission of Ordnance Survey on behalf of HMSO. © Crown Copyright. All rights reserved. Disclaimer: Some brochs were built with military defensive purpose, and as such can be situated in extremely dangerous areas, such as on the edge of cliffs and ravines. Additionally, these are Iron Age structures, most of them in ruins, and they are extremely hazardous, with crumbling stone walls and hidden chambers. Existing walls, lintels, and passages could collapse at any time. The information here is provided free but it is your responsibility to ensure its accuracy, ensure your own safety, and acquire permissions for access where necessary. Accessing brochs is done entirely at your own risk.
  20. George

    Clachtoll broch

    This was an interesting day out as the broch was being excavated while I was there. It meant rather than a jumble of rocks, I could actually see a lot of the original stonework. There was even a bowl of some kind showing in the floor. The excavations have brought this broch to life. Access is easy, get yourself to Clachtoll and there is plenty of parking. Everyone knows where the broch is and can point you in the right direction. It's not far to walk, and there is a good path along the shore from a picnic area. Reproduced by permission of Ordnance Survey on behalf of HMSO. © Crown Copyright. All rights reserved. There is a rather intriguing architectural feature in this broch, a feature I've seen elsewhere, but which I've never commented on. This is my 106th broch bagged over a good number of years, but until now I've never commented on the pyramid stone lintels above the entrances of a few brochs. I've kept my thoughts to myself, and with each passing broch I've thought more about them, and now I feel confident enough to put forward a theory on how they came to be there. You see, I don't think the Picts built brochs with pyramid lintels, I think they were added later. Here is the lintel of Carn Liath broch, near Brora. Note that if fits the broch perfectly, with no loose stones jammed in anywhere, with the orginal walls built around the lintel. The stonework is perfect. Here is the entrance to Dun Dornaigil. Does the stone fit the broch exactly? No it doesn't. Were the walls of the broch built around this stone? No, they were not. This is a bodge job by someone who moved in long after the PIcts and had the broch altered. The lintel stone doesn't even look contemporary with the rest of the broch. This is the lintel above the entrance to Caisteal na Colle, or Castle Cole as it's also known, in Strath Brora. Look how perfectly the lintel fits the broch stonework. The walls were obviously built around the lintel. Look at the two stones to the right. Look how perfectly the stonework fits. This is an original lintel. Here is the lintel above the entrance to the Ousdale Burn broch. Again, see how perfectly the stone matches the broch, and how perfectly the walls have been built around it. Here is the pyramid lintel above the entrance to Clachtoll broch. Talk about a bodge job? Seems there have been cowboy builders around since forever. I do not believe this is the original lintel. Disclaimer: Some brochs were built with military defensive purpose, and as such can be situated in extremely dangerous areas, such as on the edge of cliffs and ravines. Additionally, these are Iron Age structures, most of them in ruins, and they are extremely hazardous, with crumbling stone walls and hidden chambers. Existing walls, lintels, and passages could collapse at any time. The information here is provided free but it is your responsibility to ensure its accuracy, ensure your own safety, and acquire permissions for access where necessary. Accessing brochs is done entirely at your own risk.
  21. George

    Carn na Mairg Broch (Cairn Merk)

    There must have been quite a community of Picts living around Westerdale for so many to be clustered so closely together. I'm sure they had many happy days, despite the bastard Romans and their lust for one world governance. There are four brochs clustered together around Westerdale, and it's possible to visit them all in a single outing. There is a track from the main road all the way to Carn na Mairg. Reproduced by permission of Ordnance Survey on behalf of HMSO. © Crown Copyright. All rights reserved. Disclaimer: Some brochs were built with military defensive purpose, and as such can be situated in extremely dangerous areas, such as on the edge of cliffs and ravines. Additionally, these are Iron Age structures, most of them in ruins, and they are extremely hazardous, with crumbling stone walls and hidden chambers. Existing walls, lintels, and passages could collapse at any time. The information here is provided free but it is your responsibility to ensure its accuracy, ensure your own safety, and acquire permissions for access where necessary. Accessing brochs is done entirely at your own risk.
  22. George

    Cairn of Elsay Broch (Staxigoe)

    Amazing site perched on the coast. It is not far from The Pap broch, reinforcing my belief that all brochs in the Highlands were connected by line of sight. How else could the Picts have possibly survived 4 Roman military campaigns in Scotland? Communications and intelligence are vital to military victory, and line of sight is the only possible way the Picts could have passed intelligence quickly around the Highlands. It was also while spending time at this broch, trying to picture life at war with the Romans, that I finally settled on where the Picts had come from. I now firmly believe they were Israelites who had fled Israel to escape the Romans. That would also add weight to the legend of Joseph of Arimathea travelling to Scotland. It this were true, and Joseph did travel to Scotland, it is plausible that Calgacus and Joseph of Arimathea were one and the same person, and the Picts were of the tribes of Israel. The Picts were not savages, they were intelligent, they were organised, they were industrious, they were warriors and they defeated Rome. Reproduced by permission of Ordnance Survey on behalf of HMSO. © Crown Copyright. All rights reserved. Disclaimer: Some brochs were built with military defensive purpose, and as such can be situated in extremely dangerous areas, such as on the edge of cliffs and ravines. Additionally, these are Iron Age structures, most of them in ruins, and they are extremely hazardous, with crumbling stone walls and hidden chambers. Existing walls, lintels, and passages could collapse at any time. The information here is provided free but it is your responsibility to ensure its accuracy, ensure your own safety, and acquire permissions for access where necessary. Accessing brochs is done entirely at your own risk.
  23. George

    Bruan broch

    A grassy mound is all there is to see, but there is probably much archaeology under the ground. The broch is right beside the road, there is parking a few yards further along the road, and there is a gate onto the site. Reproduced by permission of Ordnance Survey on behalf of HMSO. © Crown Copyright. All rights reserved. Disclaimer: Some brochs were built with military defensive purpose, and as such can be situated in extremely dangerous areas, such as on the edge of cliffs and ravines. Additionally, these are Iron Age structures, most of them in ruins, and they are extremely hazardous, with crumbling stone walls and hidden chambers. Existing walls, lintels, and passages could collapse at any time. The information here is provided free but it is your responsibility to ensure its accuracy, ensure your own safety, and acquire permissions for access where necessary. Accessing brochs is done entirely at your own risk.
  24. A grassy mound on a rocky outcrop makes for a dramatic setting, with clear line of sight to a number of other brochs. It is in a field on the Forse estate, so find parking around Forse and do a little walking. There is no need to climb fences or stone dykes as there are good gates on the estate, you just need to look for them. Reproduced by permission of Ordnance Survey on behalf of HMSO. © Crown Copyright. All rights reserved. Disclaimer: Some brochs were built with military defensive purpose, and as such can be situated in extremely dangerous areas, such as on the edge of cliffs and ravines. Additionally, these are Iron Age structures, most of them in ruins, and they are extremely hazardous, with crumbling stone walls and hidden chambers. Existing walls, lintels, and passages could collapse at any time. The information here is provided free but it is your responsibility to ensure its accuracy, ensure your own safety, and acquire permissions for access where necessary. Accessing brochs is done entirely at your own risk.
  25. George

    Achnagoul Broch

    A lintelled entrance and a few exterior stones poke through a grassy mound, which makes this a rather interesting grassy mound, as far as grassy mounds go. Access to the broch is straightforward, walking up a track and closing a couple of gates behind you, but parking is far from straightforward. I found a place on the verge a couple of hundred yards along the single track road, but you may have to find somewhere more suitable and walk back along the road to the track. The track leads to two private dwellings, so please respect their privacy. Reproduced by permission of Ordnance Survey on behalf of HMSO. © Crown Copyright. All rights reserved. Disclaimer: Some brochs were built with military defensive purpose, and as such can be situated in extremely dangerous areas, such as on the edge of cliffs and ravines. Additionally, these are Iron Age structures, most of them in ruins, and they are extremely hazardous, with crumbling stone walls and hidden chambers. Existing walls, lintels, and passages could collapse at any time. The information here is provided free but it is your responsibility to ensure its accuracy, ensure your own safety, and acquire permissions for access where necessary. Accessing brochs is done entirely at your own risk.
  26. A rather uninteresting grassy mound is all that's left, which is easy to miss if you didn't know there was a broch there. The broch has been completely quarried for its stone and there is nothing left. However, they're all important, and visiting these sites can give you insights into how the Picts lived and how they defeated the Romans. Easiest access may be through the nearby farm and asking for access, otherwise barbed wire fences and rough ground await to assail you. Reproduced by permission of Ordnance Survey on behalf of HMSO. © Crown Copyright. All rights reserved. Disclaimer: Some brochs were built with military defensive purpose, and as such can be situated in extremely dangerous areas, such as on the edge of cliffs and ravines. Additionally, these are Iron Age structures, most of them in ruins, and they are extremely hazardous, with crumbling stone walls and hidden chambers. Existing walls, lintels, and passages could collapse at any time. The information here is provided free but it is your responsibility to ensure its accuracy, ensure your own safety, and acquire permissions for access where necessary. Accessing brochs is done entirely at your own risk.
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